Interactive Sessions - Kids' Tech University (KTU) at BGSU    
Dr. Andrea Kalinoski April 08, 2017
How do microscopes help scientists understand what makes up a cell?

An interactive session led by Dr. Andrea Kalinoski

Associate Professor at the University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences in the Department of Surgery

How do microscopes help scientists understand what makes up a cell? Microscopes help by allowing scientists to see tiny internal structures within the cell that are invisible to the eye. These tiny structures are colorless and translucent making them hard to visualize. Scientists in the life sciences often use a confocal microscope to visualize fluorescently labeled structures in fixed and living cells or tissue. Confocal microscopy is a new technology that enables scientists to capture “light slices” through a tissue where each slice is less than 1/1000 of a mm. Computer programs are used to reconstruct the image as a three dimensional object. This technology enable scientists to see exactly where a particular protein can be found within a cell and learn more about its function in the cell. We will explore how scientists use fluorescent probes with confocal microscopy to visualize their structures of interest. Check out these images for GE’s OMG fluorescent microscope http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/28/cell-images-ge-deltavision-omx-blaze-omg-microscope_n_2965099.html?slideshow=true#gallery/288707/0 Dr. Andrea Kalinoski is an Associate Professor at the University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences in the Department of Surgery. She earned her PhD in Medical Sciences from the Medical College of Ohio at Toledo in 2003. She began her career studying chromosome movement in mitosis and developed a passion for microscopes and imaging as a Postdoc at the University of Toledo. While developing these imaging techniques she helped to establish the Advanced Microscopy & Imaging Center. She is now the Technical Director of the Integrated Core Facilities which includes the Advanced Microscopy & Imaging Center, Flow Cytometry and the Genomic Core at the University of Toledo. Her current research program Uses 3D imaging to study how cells in the arterial wall of our vascular system respond to injury and inflammation.